Queen brothers meshing for Pioneers

Posted 7/23/20

Siblings don’t always see eye to eye. But more often than not, Colin and Cade Queen do.

The brothers have been a staple for the Powell Pioneers A team in the 2020 season. Colin, 18, has the …

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Queen brothers meshing for Pioneers

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Siblings don’t always see eye to eye. But more often than not, Colin and Cade Queen do.

The brothers have been a staple for the Powell Pioneers A team in the 2020 season. Colin, 18, has the team’s best ERA at 2.03 and leads the Pioneers with a .553 batting average. Cade, in his first season at the A level as a 14-year-old, is batting .302 and has a 6.58 ERA — both respectable figures.

For Colin, who is playing in his last season of American Legion Baseball, teaming up with his brother is a dream come true.

“It’s really fun,” Colin said. “I’ve been waiting for it for a while, and I’m glad it’s finally happening.”

When it comes to sibling athletes, the relationships are often defined by smack talk and friendly competition. But the Queen brothers prefer to help each other out.

“We more just try to build each other up,” Cade said. “We occasionally joke around, but not much though. We get along really well.”

Colin added, “We try to keep it low key and try not to trash on each other too much.”

Colin has played for the Pioneers’ A squad since he was 14. He was once in Cade’s shoes, so he knows how hard the adjustment can be. That’s why Colin preached fearlessness to his younger brother when Cade made the leap.

“Just confidence,” Colin said. “I got brought up, and you’re playing against big, mature 18-year-olds, and it’s hard to get used to.”

When the Pioneers’ season ends, Colin will head across the country to begin his college career at Quincy University, a Division II program in eastern Illinois.

In each season with the Pioneers, Colin has improved and seen his production increase. Pioneers head coach Joe Cates said this development and dedication will suit him well as he makes the next jump — from American Legion to college baseball.

“In the four years, Colin has developed tremendously. His at-bats have been great all four years,” Cates said. “I think his confidence has built up this year, and that’s the difference we see. He’s done a great job, he puts in the work, and it’s showing this year. He’s at the baseball field at 6 a.m. almost every day taking hacks.”

Once Colin graduates from the program, the torch will be passed to Cade. It will be up to him to carry on the family legacy set by his older brother.

If his first year is any indication, Cade will be a strong player in the program for years to come.

“He’s young, but he’s been doing everything we ask him to,” Cates said. “He fields the ball well, he has good plate appearances, he’s been pitching well. Mental maturity has to come, and that’s with all my young guys, but they’re 14, so I get it.”

“I expect good things from Cade,” the coach said.

His first season has had its ups and downs, but Cade has already shown promise as a young player in the Pioneers’ system. The 14-year-old hopes this lone season playing alongside his older brother boosts his output for years to come.

“He [Colin] just keeps me going when I think I’m maybe not doing good. It just helps me out, which makes me feel very good,” Cade said. “Just giving each other the opportunity to help each other through hard times.”

Powell Pioneers

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