How Does Your Garden Grow?

Do It Yourself garden projects

By Katherine Clarkson
Posted 5/1/20

The days are longer, the sun is shining brighter, and the essence of spring is in the air. Before you realize, you will plant your outside garden. But in the meantime, here are some easy indoor …

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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Do It Yourself garden projects

Posted

The days are longer, the sun is shining brighter, and the essence of spring is in the air. Before you realize, you will plant your outside garden. But in the meantime, here are some easy indoor garden projects you can build with supplies you have around the house.

In this column, we will learn how to cultivate vegetables from kitchen scraps, transform a gallon jug into a miniature greenhouse, reconstruct a 2-liter bottle into a self-watering container and a decorative way to use a canning jar.

This first project will make the most out of your produce scraps, lower your grocery bill and all you need is a cutting utensil and a dish of water. We are going to regrow vegetables.

The green onion and leek are the most popular and easiest to regrow. When you cut your scallion or leek, snip where the light green meets the dark green on the stem and keep the bottom part. Then you can either place your clipping in a jar and cover the previously established roots with about 2 inches of lukewarm water and then change the water every four days. Or you can press the rooted end directly into the soil.

To regrow celery, cut it about 2 inches from the base. Next, stand the base in a dish with water, leaving the top part exposed to the air. When you see new leaves sprout from the middle, let them continue to grow for about a week, after that transfer it into a pot of soil.

We can apply the same technique for romaine lettuce, bok choy and cabbage. Many herbs can quickly re-sprout from a clipping such as rosemary, sage, mint and basil. To achieve this, determine a non-woody stem and make a bias (diagonal) cut 4 to 6 inches long right below the node. The node is the point of attachment where a branch reaches the stem. Remove three or four leaves and set the clipping upright in a glass of water. When you observe new roots growing, transfer it to a pot of soil.

If you wish to start your seeds indoors, the following project is suitable for you.

You can quickly convert a gallon container into a miniature greenhouse. You will need a container, scissors, soil and seeds.

Wash the container and cut horizontally about 4 inches from the bottom, leaving 2 or 3 inches attached to serve as a hinge. Next, add some holes in the bottom for drainage. Fill the lower half of the container with pre-moistened soil and follow the directions on the seed packet to sow the seed.

The next DIY project will repurpose a 2-liter bottle into a self-watering planter. All you need are a 2-liter bottle, string or yarn, a hammer, a Phillips screwdriver, soil and seeds.

Remove the cap and using your hammer and Phillips screwdriver make a hole in the center of the cap. Cut your string/yarn 1 to 2 feet long, thread both ends through the hole in the cap and tie the two ends together so the knot is on the inside of the cover. Screw the lid back on the bottle and nest the top half of the bottle (cap facing down) in the bottle’s base. Add soil, seeds and water from the top the first time to ensure the soil and the string are uniformly wet. Water in the bottom from here onwards. This last project will repurpose a Mason jar and all you need are clamps, a Mason jar, rocks, soil and seeds.

Add the rocks to the bottom, which will allow the soil to drain; after that, add the soil and seeds adhering to the directions on the seed package. Attach the clamp around the jar and fasten the clamp to the wall. You can also attach the clamps to a decorative backdrop such as a stained wood pallet, an old door or window shutters.

We have explored various DIY garden projects using supplies you have at home. These are entertaining, free and satisfying projects for the whole family.

Happy gardening! If you have queries, suggestions, or want to learn more about DIY garden projects, please email me at: katherineclarkson2@gmail.com.

(Katherine Clarkson is president of the Park County Master Gardeners. She lives in Wapiti.)

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